Category Archives: Twitter

Twitter-related

LinkedIn Company Profiles have limits too!

In prepping for Version 3.0 of Rock The World with your Online Presence, our hit LinkedIn Profile and SEO book, we had to make a little extra room. Since our book was released, right after the LinkedIn design change in late 2009, the LinkedIn Company Profile feature came on board and we had to dive into it of course. In the Rock The World book we refer to these instructional videos as “Timeless Updates”.

In this video, we (Mike O’Neil and Lori Ruff, The LinkedIn Rockstars), explain the limits regarding LinkedIn Company profiles. Lori even provides some extra tips that only VIEWERS of the video get to learn.

TO SEE THE EXTRA TIP – watch the video!


Limit #1 – The key LinkedIn limit regarding company profiles is the space allowed for the Company Description. It is 1,500 characters and carriage returns count as 2 here. Use a word processor and copy/paste the text. ♦ Special characters ♦ are not a bad idea either. Short paragraphs, some bullets. Think of it how you would think of a LinkedIn Profile Summary in many ways.

Limit #2 – Specialties are tags that you can add to increase your appeal to individuals and search engines. You get up to 20 keywords or key PHRASES. Watch the video for the secret tip on getting the most out of Specialty tags.

There are other limits that you are not likely to run into (# of products or services listed). If they become significant, we will feature a post on those as well.

See related post on LinkedIn Limits

Click below to see the Integrated Alliances Company Page, follow if you like.

btn cofollow badge LinkedIn Company Profiles have limits too!

Does this help?

LinkedIn Corporate Adoption and LinkedIn API’s driving growth in 2011

This video itself is a LinkedIn Success story. Through LinkedIn inviting, LinkedIn Thank You Messages (ala Gary Vaynerchuk’s book “The Thank You Economy“) and a little insight, Splash Media founder Paul Slack and Integrated Alliances Founder Mike O’Neil struck up a relationship that led to a meeting and to this video interview.

In the interview with former CNN anchor Renay San Miguel, Mike O’Neil discuses corporate adoption of LInkedIn and the capabilities that the LinkedIn API will bring to users in 2011.

Video not available

Splash Media provides turnkey social media solutions for small and medium sized businesses who can’t quite afford to bring on a full-tome Social Media specialist. Integrated Alliances provides corporate LinkedIn training solutions, primarily for sales teams at technology firms. The IA executive team of Mike O’Neil & Lori Ruff are also dynamic keynote speakers on Social Media.

BOTH2B 300x258 LinkedIn Corporate Adoption and LinkedIn APIs driving growth in 2011

How LinkedIn Thank You notes and concert stories can drive business relationships

This is what comes from 1) being authentic 2) writing custom invitations 3) being referred and 4) sending Thank You messages.  This is the actual string.  IT IS BEST READ FROM THE BOTTOM UP.


Hi Mike,

Thanks for linking to me. I look forward to learning from you.

Thought it would be fun to share my first album and first concert with you:

First album: (7th grade) Deep Purple: Machine Head. My friend had an older brother who had it and I had to have it. (I am not counting the Bobby Sherman album that I cut out of the back of a Cheerios box icon smile How LinkedIn Thank You notes and concert stories can drive business relationships

First concert: Aerosmith and Golden Earring – also 7th grade.

John

On 04/12/11 1:03 AM, Mike O’Neil wrote:
——————–
Thank you for the invitation to connect on LinkedIn. Your profile comments are very inspiring to me. I watch Almost Famous nearly every month.

We ROCK at LinkedIn. As “The LinkedIn Rockstars”, we speak, train and write real books on LinkedIn and Social Media at an expert level all over the world.

Rock? I played the Fillmore in San Francisco Nov 2010, sharing the stage with members of the Allman Brothers, Paul McCartney’s Band and even Aerosmith, but that’s a different story…

♫ So, why does this matter? ♫

We take this Rock n Roll side and funnel the energy into our LinkedIn Corporate Sales Training Programs, refined over 5 years and 400+ LinkedIn training sessions.

Getting to Top on LinkedIn (29,900+ connections) taught me things that I share with our clients – mostly tech companies with sales teams.

We wrote “Rock The World with your Online Presence”, the world’s #1 rockin’ LinkedIn business book. It’s a near bible for LinkedIn Profile Optimization and related SEO, the 188 pgs packed with classic rock song references.

http://RockTheWorldBook.com

Interested in talking further? If so, simply REPLY back. Myself, or someone from our team, will listen, understand, share some insights and help you take the next steps LinkedIn and business development.

Rock on!

Mike O’Neil
The LinkedIn Rockstar

You might also check out my partner Lori Ruff, The LinkedIn Diva, at http://LinkedIn.com/in/LoriRuff . She rocks too!

On April 11, 2011 8:00 PM, John King wrote:
——————–
Hi Mike,

Bill Clanton suggested I link to you.

You had me at “Almost Famous and Office Space” icon smile How LinkedIn Thank You notes and concert stories can drive business relationships

Reading your profile is actually entertaining – especially for a music lover who spent every spare nickel on albums and concerts as a kid.

John King


Which Websites should you put in your LinkedIn profile and why?

0081 115x150 Which Websites should you put in your LinkedIn profile and why?LinkedIn offers up 3 Website links in your LinkedIn profile. Mike O’Neil, The LinkedIn Rockstar, explain that while users might be tempted to use them for a Blog or for Twitter, this is NOT, however, where they should be used. LinkedIn has special support for Blogs (through Applications) and special support for Twitter.

 

Facebook is one link you might consider adding and it begs a question. Should it be a link to your Facebook Profile or your Facebook Page? If you don’t have a Facebook Page, then that’s an easy one to answer – your Facebook Profile.

My partner Lori Ruff and I are trying a new idea for handling URL’s, especially Social Media URL’s, and it is in use on our LinkedIn profiles. We are using a site that houses ALL of our URL’s, www.itsmyURLs.com, so people can access to all 15 or so of our Social Media links in a nice easy to select format. Here are 3 examples – combined and individual.

See the LinkedIn Rockstar Team Link Page

See Mike O’Neil’s Link Page

See Lori Ruff’s Link Page

SIMPLIFY Your Social Media Communications, especially for LinkedIn Users

LinkedIn is easy, Social Media is hard!

We say that over and over and it becomes quite apparent in our LinkedIn sales trainings. We get asked to explain social media even in LinkedIn class. It’s now part of the curriculum.

Is this your life now?

Communications are coming in from ever direction

Is it a Message, an Invite, a Request, a Recommendation, a Request FOR a Recommendation, an Update, a Post, a Comment, a Reply, a List?

The terminology is a mess!

Are you a Friend, a Fan, a Connection, a 1, a 2, a 3, a Follower, a “Followee”, a Subscriber, a Liker, a “Likee”, WHEW!!

Here are a few helpful techniques that I personally use to get by until a technical solution emerges:

LinkedIn

I have my LinkedIn communications settings set so that few communications come to me as individual emails. I only receive messages from the 4 groups I manage. I am on LinkedIn all the time, even on the iPhone. Still, if you check in daily, this communication technique is a good one.

I disconnect from people that over-communicate and are NOT in any way strategic. They are not notified. I have deleted 2,500 people form my network to stay under 30,000 so I really know this one. When “removing connection” the only information LinkedIn gives you is their First Name and Last Name.

Facebook

As with LinkedIn, I disconnect from people that over-communicate and are NOT in any way strategic. I “unlike” Pages that over-communicate as well. They are not notified. I’ve deleted 1,500 Friends and at least 500 Pages to stay under the 5,000 limit.

Did you know that Page “Likes” count against the 5,000 Friend limit? Yep. If you “fill up” like I did, the first place to start shedding is Pages!

Avoid the massive picture Tags. They seem like a scams, waste your time and fill your InBox needlessly. “Untag” yourself in them. This is especially big around the holidays.

Twitter

Use tools like Hootsuite or TweetDeck to organize yourself, schedule your Tweets, views conversations (nice!), view select Tweets based on Who, keywords, hashtags and several others. I hope that these quick ideas help you get Social Media communications under control a little bit better. They help me and I am still swamped much of the time. Still, my life is a little more extreme in this area so don’t let it scare YOU rom getting involved with Social Media.

Rock on!

Marketing Your Events Through Social Media – Getting Started

It seems events are a central part of Social Media, which has its roots in Social Networking. We are talking about the PHYSICAL, in-person interaction between individuals, particularly at live events.

As such, the major Social Media platforms either have direct support for events or they are used to support the promotion of events and even activities AT events.

Randy1 300x214 Marketing Your Events Through Social Media   Getting StartedIn this multi-part series, we examine some techniques for maximizing exposure for your event on Social Media. We highlight our just-completed 2010 8th Annual Integrated Alliances’ Denver Holiday Party (Nov 30, 2010) as the real world example; because real world is better than theory.

The series will cover some strategies, techniques and explore some simple, yet amazingly powerful extras along the ways – Super Tips.

We will explore all of the major platforms (LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter, Meetup.com, YouTube and Blogs) and what they offer to help you promote and manage events and to manage invaluable follow-up after events.

PART I

First, you must use care and consider scope. What actions happen first is VERY important as you spread the word and try to avoid making mistakes, some of which cannot be corrected.

On the scope side, this series is not designed to teach event planning, although these cutting edge practices from the front lines will be of a lot of interest to event planners and even to event attendees.

We start with this information given – date, time, location, cost, descriptive text, pictures, links. See the event information for the real world case study – the 2010 8th Annual Integrated Alliances’ Denver Holiday Party.

Super Tip #1 - Promote the event using an easy to remember, nice looking Domain Name (URL). There are many reasons for this. You will want to forward but NOT mask the domain if your target is using a payment button such as Paypal.

  1. The vanity URL looks good in text and in print. You can’t click on a flier (i.e., www.DenverHolidayParty.com).blog post forwarded vanity url 300x55 Marketing Your Events Through Social Media   Getting Started
  2. The vanity URL replaces ugly URL strings with something attractive that reinforces your brand and makes it easy for people to remember (i.e., www.DenverHolidayParty.com).
  3. It gives you the flexibility to redirect it to any place you like (e.g. Landing Page, Primary Registration Site, Backup Registration Site, Event Closed Screen, Post-event site).

In our case, we used 2 such domains – DenverHolidayParty.com and SocialNetParty.com. In fact, after the event, each is now redirected to the pictures on Metromix, taken by photographer Howie Grapek. Metromix is a division of Colorado’s #1 TV channel 9News.

Super Tip #2 - If you want others to promote your event, make it easy for them. Create a simple 1 page flier and host it on the web, like on your web site or blog site. You can update it as the events shapes up and interested parties can always get the latest version to download. It works with tip #1 as well. We still have our promotional flier for the event up at SocialNetEvents.com; check it out.

And then check back for Part II and Part III coming soon! Get more tips and insider real-world strategies for using Social Media to promote and support your events and improve your business outlook.

Related Story

The LinkedIn Rockstars, Mike O’Neil & Lori Ruff, recently recorded a 60-minute Webinar entitled Event Networking with Social Media. Learn to find events, work events properly and follow up after events using Social Media like LinkedIn, Twitter, Facebook, Blogs.  The recording is available for free playback.

Are You a Book Author Using Your Book Cover as Your Twitter Profile Photo?

I have recently noticed several book authors new to Twitter who have been using their book covers as their Twitter profile photo.

Here is why I think this is not the optimum strategy for a book author:

First, people connect to people. It’s hard to have a relationship with a book cover.

Second, when the next book comes out and the Twitter profile photo is changed, there is no consistency for your followers.

Third, many book covers (and many company logos) lose their clear recognition factor in that small photo size.

In my opinion, the best strategy is to use a good headshot (no sunglasses or caps blocking your eyes and preferably with a smile) as your Twitter profile photo.

Then upload the photo of your book cover as the image in your Twitter account background. (For an example of this technique with an ebook image in the background, see my Twitter profile at http://twitter.com/ZimblerMiller )

You can even tile the photo (have the image repeat itself) if you want. Or, if you have several books, you can create (or have someone create for you) a montage of your book covers to use as the background image on your Twitter account.

This strategy gives you the best of both worlds:

You make it easier for people to form a connection with you by including your photo and you also share your book cover(s).

© 2010 Miller Mosaic, LLC

Phyllis Zimbler Miller (@ZimblerMiller on Twitter) and her business partner Yael K. Miller (@MillerMosaicLLC on Twitter) are committed to taking the mystery out of social media so that individuals and companies can utilize the power of social media to attract more business. See their Quick Start Social Media Track.

Will New Twitter Bring About Demands for the Return of Classic Twitter?

After sampling the New Twitter, will we active Twitter participants clamor for the return of Classic Twitter?

It’s probably too early to answer this question, although below are some of my thoughts:

Full disclosure: I just got the option to try New Twitter, so I haven’t spent much time appreciating the additional information.

But I have spent some time trying to find the old elements that I liked.

Yes, I know, there’s probably an owner’s manual somewhere with instructions, but I like to test things out the way I suspect most people do: clicking on the various buttons, etc. WITHOUT first reading the instructions.

One thing I do know – when the day comes that ONLY the New Twitter is available, I’ll have to revise my company’s free report found at www.millermosaicpowerof3.com

That said, right now those of us who have the option for New Twitter can also switch back to Classic Twitter.

Some of my first impressions:

• New Twitter can be overwhelming for new people. There’s so much to look at on a single web page. Plus for new people it will be even less clear what the advantage is of all that additional information.

• I don’t like the Direct Messages format. First, I couldn’t find the info at all. (Click MESSAGES on the top nav bar of your Twitter account to the right of PROFILE.) Second, both the sent DMs and the received DMs appear in the same column. (Oh, dear, I actually had to think about what I was sending and receiving.)

• I DO like the complete URL link showing in my profile. But now I’m left with another dilemma – does this mean the newest profile link I’m using – http://unhub.com/phylliszimblermiller in order to share more links than just one – is too confusing so people won’t click on it?

And if you have any first impressions, comments, yeahs or nays re New Twitter, please leave these below!

© 2010 Miller Mosaic, LLC

Phyllis Zimbler Miller (@ZimblerMiller on Twitter) and her business partner Yael K. Miller (@MillerMosaicLLC on Twitter) are committed to taking the mystery out of social media so that individuals and companies can utilize the power of social media to attract more business. See their Quick Start Social Media Track.

Optimize Your Online Digital Footprint

Social Media is really good at getting your identity out there. Simply existing does some of this, engaging in activities does a lot more. Either way, this “Digital Footprint” is what people will see when your paths cross (and visa versa in most cases).

In our LinkedIn book entitled “Rock The World with your Online Presence”, Lori Ruff and I focus on Digital Footprint as well as super-optimizing LinkedIn Profiles, LinkedIn Search Engine Optimization (SEO) and visibility.

We go through your LinkedIn Identity, section by section, optimizing each component and each LinkedIn setting for maximum effect.

Focusing on LinkedIn, there are 2 main elements to the Digital Footprint. This carries forward into Google, Bing and elsewhere of course.

Mike 1 faces NEW 200 150x148 Optimize Your Online Digital FootprintYour picture is the first. In LinkedIn this should be a headshot just of you. A white background is best. The stiff professional shot you see in newspapers works for some, for others it is a polo, for some it is a Concert T. Still, it has to be a picture.

I once used this picture from the cover of our Rock The World book as my LinkedIn picture. Then, one day it was just gone. LinkedIn had pulled it.

The second part of your Digital Footprint is your LinkedIn Headline. It’s the centerpiece to your Digital Footprint actually. Show up in a list, send a note, participate in a discussion, they all display THIS INFORMATION as well as your picture.

Here is an excerpt from the Rock The World with your Online Presence, a 188 page LinkedIn Profile and Search Engine Optimization (SEO) Guide for LinkedIn and Google.

To get the whole scoop and to get really cranking in business as a result of LinkedIn, check out the Rock The World books. “Rock The World 1″ on LinkedIn Profiles and SEO is only $19.95 and its available at Amazon.com. Learn about the next book in the series, Rock The World with Social Media, (Rock The World 2), The Ultimate Social Media Guide for LinkedIn Users.

—–

RTW Icon 3 Rev2 150x150 Optimize Your Online Digital Footprint
Rock The World with LinkedIn Radio Show


From Page 48 in the book – The 70’s Rock Band KISS says “Shout it out loud!”

Your LinkedIn Headline is where you want to focus your greatest attention, especially on a “per-character basis.” You need to leap off the page with your “wordsmithing.”

If the song coming across your radio doesn’t catch you in the first few chords, you might just go on to the next station. The same thing holds true for LinkedIn. The Headline is of particular importance, as it shows up in search results. A good one will attract people to look at your full profile.

The Headline is the first area encountered by a viewer, even before they see your Summary. It is brief (only 120 characters); an ever so important blurb that states what you do and what you are looking for. This is a VERY important area to nail down and take advantage of.

Why is the headline so important? Beyond your name, current company and current job title, it is the text that others see when you show up in search results. If your headline looks interesting, they may click through to your Profile to see more. If they do not find it appealing, it is off to the next person. Use as many of the 120 characters as possible.

TIP – If you type too many characters in any form field, LinkedIn will reject the change, indicate how many you are allowed, and tell you how many you have total. This is a nifty feature that keeps you from having to guess how much to trim.

Here are some examples of “short” headlines:

– President, Strategic Systems LLC
– Business coach helping Entrepreneurs
– Sr. Sales Manager, MCI
– Branch Manager, Phoenix, Cbeyond
– Executive Recruiter specializing in IT

Now, here are some more advanced headlines. Notice the difference:

– Public Speaker, Entrepreneur and Author of “The Total Idiot’s Guide to Yahoo”
– CEO, CommonCraft Ventures LLC, investing in green energy concerns
– Sr. Development Manager, INFO for The Go, developers of mobile applications for the Oil and Gas Industry
– V.P. Sales, Sprint, covering West Coast Operations
– Chief Operating Officer (COO), Managed Hosting PLC, managed data center solutions for streaming media

Some might get even more advanced. Here are real headlines from real experts (found by searching on the LinkedIn keyword “expert”):

– Key Expert Work Injury and Rehabilitation at EU China Social Security Reform Co-operation Project
– EDI/B2B Process Expert, Business Development, Product Management and Wireless Mobile Computing Professional
– On-Air Talent, Lifestyle and Trend Expert, Author, Guest Speaker, Stylist
– SharePoint SME, Workflow Architect at John Wiley and Sons

Here is Mike O’Neil’s headline:

LinkedIn Trainer | Social Media Authority, Speaker, Author | Evangelist, Entertainer ♫ The LinkedIn Rockstar ♫ 29,000+

Here is Lori Ruff’s Headline:

The LinkedIn DIVA, Social Networking Master | Social Media Speaker, Trainer, Author | TopLinked.com | #9 LinkedIn Woman

More on the Importance of your LinkedIn headline

Couchsurfing – The very essence of Social Networking


Lori Ruff and I have been a part of CouchSurfing.org now for almost a year. In the last 6 months we have ramped up to the point where we had three individual Couchsurfing visitors at ONE time this week.

Couchsurfing.org has a process to certify individuals in the program and it costs a nominal amount to get setup in the system. Check it out!

If you’ve seen the movies “The Big Chill” or “The Breakfast Club”, you know how strangers are not strangers for very long when couped-up with one another. Such is the case here.

You never know who you might have request to “crash at your pad” or where you might stay. Here’s who we’ve met: a Guatemalan diplomat, a German filmmaker, a family from Poland, a National Geographic scale photographer, global travelers, an IT manager, those in town for the Widespread Panic concert, those considering a move to Colorado (a good idea).

It is a bit like a Grateful Dead concert where you don’t actually go in to the show – you just explore “The Village” outside for hours and hours, meeting people every few yards. Lori Ruff and I did just that in 2009. It is a highlight of the concert year for both of us. You meet the darndest people and some you would just NEVER expect (i.e., a high school football coach).

I felt this was such an interesting and powerful series of experiences that I actually put it on my LinkedIn Profile as a current position – Couchsurfing Host & Guest at IA Social Media. A quick LinkedIn search on the Boolean search term “Couchsurfer OR Couchsurfing” yielded over 800 hits just now!

See Mike O’Neil’s LinkedIn Profile with Couchsurfing listed: http://www.linkedin.com/in/mikeoneil

Want to see the AMAZING work of our German Filmmaker friend Chris Dahm ( @crisdahm ) before he completes his documentary-style footage of Lori and I?

Cris3 Couchsurfing   The very essence of Social Networking

Cris2 Couchsurfing   The very essence of Social Networking

Cris1 Couchsurfing   The very essence of Social Networking


.




At Integrated Alliances HQ                                With Lori                                        With Mike

See Cris’ Video Diary as he travels the world – WOW!

www.youtube.com/user/crisdahm or  www.crisdahm.com


One last thing before I leave you today…

We just finished up our second Rock The World Social Media book, Rock The World with Social Media. It’s “The Ultimate Social Media Guide for LinkedIn Users”.

Find out more and pre-order at www.RockTheWorld2.com. $21.95 gets you a Signed First Edition copy.

RTW SocialMedia CVR 5 300 Couchsurfing   The very essence of Social Networking

Twitter Has New Features

Twitter is my favorite social media platform, and it just got better with the addition of four new features although not all of these new features are created equal:

More info in email notifications of new followers – 5 stars:

The emails announcing new followers now have a great deal more information than before. Besides a more pleasing design layout, you can learn a lot about your new follower without even clicking through to the follower’s bio.

Definitely a 5-star feature for ease-of-use.

Suggestions of who you might want to follow – 4 stars:

On your Twitter account home page you’ll now see the headline “Who to Follow” and I do appreciate having these Twitter users brought to my attention.
The reason for the 4 stars rather than 5 is because I also find this new feature somewhat distracting. If I’ve come on Twitter.com to check something specific, I have to be careful not to go off on a tangent checking out Twitter’s suggestions for me.

Shared followers – 3 stars:

When you go to someone’s profile on Twitter (whether or not you follow that person), over on the right-hand side under “Actions” you’ll see “You Both Follow.”

I give this feature 3 stars because I’m not particularly interested in knowing this about most Twitter users. But there may be times when I’ll find this useful.

Following followers – 2 stars:

And on someone’s profile (whether or not you follow that person) under the follow button you will see “Also followed by” and if you click on the word “others” you get “You follow these followers of [Twitter user]

This gets 2 stars for confusing language. What “Also followed by” really means is that these are the people you follow who are following the Twitter user whose profile you are on. I also don’t see the relevancy of this feature.

Extra tip: If there are people whose every tweet you don’t want to miss, you can get an RSS feed for their tweets at the bottom right-hand side of their profile page.

© 2010 Miller Mosaic, LLC

Phyllis Zimbler Miller (@ZimblerMiller on Twitter) and her business partner Yael K. Miller (@MillerMosaicLLC on Twitter) are committed to taking the mystery out of social media so that individuals and companies can utilize the power of social media to attract more business.

Tweeting New and Old Information on Twitter

As I have written before, Twitter deceptively appears simple when it is anything but simple. There are written rules – and many unwritten rules – that it is wise to follow in order to reap the most benefits from Twitter.

Thus when I was a little startled by something a client new to Twitter asked, I realized that this would be a good blog post topic.

The client asked why not tweet with links to the client’s older television show appearances?

I replied that there’s a time frame element of sharing tweets on Twitter that needs to be considered.

A tweet with a link to a new article about the client was more than appropriate. But a better way to handle past television show appearances would be to tweet a link to his website page that features these television appearances.

In other words, the television show appearances are not new, so if the client tweeted a link to each old show those tweets could be viewed as offputting on Twitter.

Now before anyone jumps down my throat about tweeting older information, let me clarify what I’m talking about. Appearances (or the videos of the appearances) have a shorter shelf life on Twitter than information, which remains fresh for a longer time.

For example, sometimes when I am followed by an author new to Twitter, I will tweet a reply to that person along the lines of: If you are looking for material on book marketing, see my articles at http://budurl.com/bookmarketarticles

While I wrote these articles some time ago, the information is being offered to people new to Twitter who might need the information now. I am not tweeting links to the blog posts I did two years ago or one year ago or even one month ago.

At the moment my blog is the link in my Twitter profile, and people coming to my blog for the first time can search for specific blog post topics. But I don’t tweet links to these posts now – I tweet links to new posts that I or others have written – new material that is now available for people to read and learn from.

Remember, one of the strongest advantages of Twitter is the ease of tweeting in real time.

I’ll admit that, whenever there’s an earthquake here in Los Angeles, Yael and I immediately tweet about it, as do many others on Twitter who experience the quake. We are using Twitter to announce the news here in LA.)

If you are not sure where to find good information to share on Twitter, subscribe by email notification or RSS feed to several blogs connected to your own areas of interest or expertise. Then on Twitter share links to the posts that you find worthwhile.

In this way you will be considered a valued participant on Twitter and yon won’t need to rely on tweeting links to old material.

And if you want to learn more about how to use Twitter effectively, check out ebook “The Wonderful World of Twitter and How It Can Help Promote Your Brand, Book, Cause or Business”

© 2010 Miller Mosaic, LLC

FYI — You can also download your copy of Phyllis Zimbler Miller’s FREE report “Twitter, Facebook and Your Website: A Beginning Blueprint for Harnessing the Power of 3”

The Ghosts of Blogs Past

Like many people, I started out on WordPress.com for my blog, it was sometime in 2008.  Built up a business blog too, also on WordPress.com.

Now, most people in the know think of WordPress.com as the “poor man’s” WordPress. They are not wrong. It is WordPress.org where things get interesting. You have to become a bit of an IT Manager, but it is worth it. Some people hire a vendor – even better idea. WordPress provides a basic migration tool that brings much of what you have created over to the “other side”.

Now for the interesting part…

wordpress logo stacked bg 150x123 The Ghosts of Blogs PastThe OLD blog site is still there and is still being found by search engines, by others.  It makes you look REALLY bad, and amazingly bad if you are in the Social Media business like us here at IA.

I had just such an incident happen yesterday so it hits real close to home. We actually had 4 old WordPress.com blogs out there that were like abandon cars. One very insightful individual did the most logical thing in thinking that it was the live site, even though the concert dates on the calendar were all really old.

There are always issues in shutting anything with a URL down.  We still have some hooks pointed back there so this is what we did to solve the problem:

  1. For every Page or Post that you think you need to leave a link in place for, do so by making them Drafts and/or Private. The links still work. This might be a time to change/update the Post/Page a bit.
  2. Simply delete out the other pages so long as you think their is no linking to preserve.
  3. On the Home Page, have links and text and even a graphic to redirect them to the new site.
  4. This is a conservative approach.  You can just shut them down if you like as well.

RRRRR 258x300 The Ghosts of Blogs PastHere is an example of an old site that redirects to the new site.

So – here’s the hard-earned lesson:

Anything that you create – a profile, a blog, a web site, will be there until you do something to explicitly take it down. Be thinking about what YOU might have hanging around out there…

Effective Social Media Marketing Requires Continual Learning

Twitter ebook SB 250 Effective Social Media Marketing Requires Continual Learning
Click on image to learn more

One of the most frustrating or most exciting elements (depending on your viewpoint) of effective social media marketing is the need to constantly keep abreast of changes in the social media tools you are already using as well as of new tools that are continually being introduced.

Now it’s probably impossible for any one person to keep up with and know everything. And this is why we all read info from others we trust — articles and blog posts help us find the news that’s important to us.

I just wrote a post at my company blog on a new Google tool that shows you how much of your home page is seen by people due to different browsers and monitors. I learned about this tool from Penny Sansevieri, whose ezine I always read. (You can read my post at http://budurl.com/gtool )

Another huge news filter are social media sites such as LinkedIn, Facebook and Twitter. This is why actively participating in such sites can help our knowledge factor as well as our business connections.

I’m pleased to be writing guest posts here on this blog, and I have also enjoyed being the Twitter marketing expert at www.Site-Booster.com.   I’m now completing my series of 30 posts for www.Site-Booster.com and I’ve used the posts as the basis for “The Wonderful World of Twitter and How It Can Help Promote Your Brand, Book, Cause or Business.” (Click on the ebook cover above if you want to learn more about this ebook.)

Bottom line? I’m thankful to all the people who share their valuable information on the Internet, and I hope that my Twitter followers, my Facebook friends and fans, and my LinkedIn connections also find my information worthwhile.

What new social media marketing info have you learned in the past week? Share a tip in the comments below.

(c) 2010 Miller Mosaic, LLC

Phyllis Zimbler Miller (@ZimblerMiller on Twitter) has an M.B.A. from The Wharton School and is an Internet business consultant. Her new FREE report is “Twitter, Facebook and Your Website: A Beginning Blueprint for Harnessing the Power of 3 for Your Business” – download the report now from www.millermosaicpowerof3.com

Social Media Marketing: One Size Does NOT Fit All

power of 3 freebie cover advanced finished 2501 Social Media Marketing: One Size Does NOT Fit All
Click book image to download free report

While I am a big proponent of using social media marketing to connect with people who might be interested in your brand, book or business, I also know that one size does not fit all.

Yet I also believe that there are some basic elements that, at this time in the evolution of social media marketing, are the most relevant for promoting your brand, book or business.

An effective marketing-driven website as a home base is needed for all online promotion activities. A website you control helps you integrate your social media activities with your overall message.

Given this, I believe Twitter and Facebook fan pages are the top two elements that should be integrated with your website. These three points of an online marketing strategy work well together to promote a brand, book or business.

And because of this belief I offer the free report “Twitter, Facebook and Your Website: A Beginning Blueprint for Harnessing the Power of 3 for Your Business” at www.millermosaicpowerof3.com

And, yes, I do also participate on LinkedIn, which I believe can have great value. Thus I’d like to share here the following LinkedIn message I received from a headhunter:

“I am curious though, as I was reading through your material and thinking about social networking and its relationship with websites, I was wondering why you didn’t include LinkedIn as one of the “powers.” After all, we are communicating via LinkedIn and came to meet each other via LinkedIn.”

It’s a good question, and here’s the answer I gave:

“Quick answer: LinkedIn can be very good for connecting with people. But in terms of overall power marketing for most people, Twitter, a Facebook fan page and an effective marketing-driven website are the important three elements in promoting their brand, book or business online. For people such as recruiters LinkedIn can be valuable for finding candidates, but that’s a different function than promoting.”

Bottom line? Using social media effectively to promote your brand, book or business requires a strategy. You need to know what target markets you are going after and where you are likely to connect with those markets.

In conclusion, while one size does not fit all, there are some basic elements that form a very good foundation on which most people can build their social media marketing strategy. If you are new to social media marketing, starting with the foundation elements is a good building plan.

© 2010 Miller Mosaic, LLC

Phyllis Zimbler Miller (@ZimblerMiller on Twitter) has an M.B.A. from The Wharton School and is an Internet business consultant. Her new FREE report is “Twitter, Facebook and Your Website: A Beginning Blueprint for Harnessing the Power of 3 for Your Business” – grab your report now from www.millermosaicpowerof3.com

Are You Promoting Your Twitter Presence Outside Twitter?

Why is promoting your Twitter presence outside of Twitter so important for effective online positioning of your brand, book or business?

Because as Twitter, in my opinion, is the easiest social media platform (of the current most popular platforms) on which to create relationships, you should be maximizing the number of people who check out your Twitter presence because of the link you provide.

If someone clicks on your Twitter link and likes what he/she sees, that person can instantly follow you without waiting for you to agree to be friends as on Facebook or connections as on LinkedIn. This is a powerful potential relationship formation strategy with no barriers to entry.

If you understand using the power of Twitter to connect with your target audiences, then thinking of relevant online places to leave your Twitter username/link should be an important element of your online marketing strategy.

Wherever you are interacting online, if appropriate promote your Twitter presence by including your Twitter username/link. And when you see someone else’s Twitter username/link on a blog comment or a website/blog, click on that link to check whether this is someone on Twitter you’d like to follow.

Here’s a “cheat sheet” to help you include your Twitter username in places outside Twitter:

Your email signature:

Do you include your Twitter username on your email signature? Options include a Twitter image that can be clicked through to your account or the URL link in your signature block.

Blog comments:

When you leave a comment on a blog, do you put your Twitter username at the end of your comment?

Blog posts:

Whether you are writing a post on your own blog or a guest blog post, do you include your Twitter username at the end of the post?

Your website/blog:

Of course your Twitter link should be prominent on any website or blog that is yours. Do NOT put the link at the very bottom of a long page. Put the link “above the fold” and on every page.

FYI — Here is the link to get official Twitter buttons — http://twitter.com/goodies/buttons Note that you must be signed into your Twitter account to access these.

LinkedIn:

LinkedIn has recently put a separate field on the profile page for a person’s Twitter username/link. Have you updated your LinkedIn account to take advantage of this new opportunity?

(c) 2010 Miller Mosaic, LLC

Phyllis Zimbler Miller (@ZimblerMiller on Twitter) has an M.B.A. from The Wharton School and is co-founder of www.MillerMosaicPowerMarketing.com. Her new FREE report is “Twitter, Facebook and Your Website: A Beginning Blueprint for Harnessing the Power of 3 for Your Business” – download the report now from www.millermosaicpowerof3.com

Using Twitter to Learn More About Internet Marketing

Most people who would like to use the Internet to promote their brand, book or business are very busy people. It is understandable that these people feel they don’t have time to read book after book or white paper after white paper of information on different aspects of Internet marketing — even though doing so could be very useful.

Therefore, here is a shortcut for learning a little more each day without being overwhelmed:

Do a search on Twitter for specific areas you’d like to learn more about, such as:

SEO (search engine optimization)

Facebook fan pages

LinkedIn

Social media marketing

Then follow people who frequently tweet about these subjects and whose tweets contain links to good blog posts on these topics.

Once each day quickly scan your Twitter stream to find two or three tweets with links to SHORT articles on these topics. Click through on the link and scan the first paragraph of the article. If the article appears that it will add to your store of knowledge, print it out for reading later in the day or evening.

Just like you make time to brush your teeth each night, make time to read the two or three short articles you’ve printed out.

Voila! You can go to sleep having learned something new — and maybe something that you can use to promote your brand, book or business online.

(c) 2010 Miller Mosaic, LLC

Phyllis Zimbler Miller is the co-founder of the Internet marketing company Miller Mosaic Power Marketing. You can get her free report “Twitter, Facebook and Your Website: A Beginning Blueprint for Harnessing the Power of 3 for Your Business” at http://www.MillerMosaicPowerof3.com

The Art of Conversation on Twitter

10 The Art of Conversation on TwitterTwitter is about conversation – really. When I first joined Twitter I didn’t understand this concept and had a hard time figuring out how a conversation could take place in the midst of what seemed like controlled chaos.

But just like learning a new language means that at first you do not understand anything and then eventually you catch on to what is being said, you must be patient in order to learn the language of Twitter.

One barrier to having good conversations on Twitter is probably the same inertia that can throw up barriers to whatever we are considering doing: We haven’t done something that way before.

Facebook and LinkedIn are easier to join in the conversation because they both have several “threaded” functions – functions where you see the first statement and then the following responding statements all clumped together.

Yet once you crack the Twitter conversation code, it can be very invigorating to participate in the conversation flow.

Of course, perhaps the most intense conversation experience on Twitter is to take part in a tweetchat – a real-time Twitter conversation on a specific topic. (It does help to be a fast typist.)

If you are relatively new to Twitter and haven’t yet figured out how to take part in the conversation, spend time “watching.” Then, when you are ready, reply to people whose tweets ask questions that you can answer or reply to people’s statements on which you’d like to expand.

And if you are also mired in inertia when it comes to revising your current website to make it more user-friendly and more search engine-friendly, read my post “Why People Are Wedded to Their Websites.” This post may get you to take action on making sure that you are effectively using social media on and off your website.

© 2010 Miller Mosaic, LLC

Phyllis Zimbler Miller (@ZimblerMiller on Twitter) has an M.B.A. from The Wharton School and is co-founder of www.MillerMosaicPowerMarketing.com. Her new FREE report is “Twitter, Facebook and Your Website: A Beginning Blueprint for Harnessing the Power of 3 for Your Business” – grab your report now from www.millermosaicpowerof3.com

LinkedIn and Twitter Tips for Effective Social Media Marketing

I’m a huge fan of using Twitter and LinkedIn effectively for developing online business relations. And that’s why I believe it is very important to get the most out of your efforts on these two social networking platforms as well as on Facebook, your blog, and wherever else online you invest time and effort in optimizing your web presence.

Below are tips for more effectively using LinkedIn and Twitter:

LinkedIn:

I accept someone’s connection and then I get back a very LONG LinkedIn message about the person’s business, etc. I DO NOT HAVE TIME TO READ THIS LONG MESSAGE.

If you want to have any chance of me reading your LinkedIn message, make it very short and easy to read. If I’m interested I’ll click on your link.

Twitter:

Someone I respect asked me what I think of “buying” Twitter followers – you know, the email offers you get promising thousands of Twitter followers for the low price of [whatever]. Here’s my answer

I don’t believe in buying followers. I believe people should grow their Twitter account organically while creating relationships. In other words, I believe you have to be willing to put in the effort in order to reap the rewards.

There’s an additional answer that may be more relevant:

When I get a new follower email notification, I check out that person’s profile. If I see thousands of followers and, for example, 11 tweets, I know that the person has probably “bought” followers. Bottom line: I’m not following that person back because he/she is not a committed Twitter community participant.

And, yes, I’d much rather follow back someone who has 20 followers and 11 tweets because this person is growing his/her followers organically by spending time deciding who to follow.

While there are automatic functions I endorse, such as using an application to selectively send my tweets through to Facebook and LinkedIn by using #fb and #in, I will repeat what I have said before:

Twitter is not a popularity contest. It is about quality, not quantity. And I truly believe that on Twitter, as with many things in life, you get what you pay for.

FYI — If you want to check how effective your Twitter profile is, get the Miller Mosaic Power Marketing FREE report “Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn: A Beginning Blueprint for Harnessing the Power of 3 for Your Business”

© 2010 Miller Mosaic, LLC

Phyllis Zimbler Miller (@ZimblerMiller on Twitter) has an M.B.A. from The Wharton School and is an Internet business consultant. For more detailed information on effectively utilizing Twitter, see “What You Should Know About Using Twitter Effectively and Strategically”

Tips for Networking at Rock Concerts

I have had tremendous success networking at rock concerts recently, especially classic rock concerts – REO Speedwagon, STYX, .38 Special, Poison, Def Leppard, The Dead (Grateful Dead circa 2009), John Mellencamp, Counting Crows, The Police, etc. Best concert ever for networking – Australian Pink Floyd at the Paramount Theater!

Look around the audience and you see “your peers” all around you. They are Tweeting and they are LinkedIn and Facebook users as well.  These folks are having a great time and they love to meet people that share their same interests.  In this case, it is their interest for music and it is EXACTLY the same musical taste as YOU.  How powerful is that?

 Tips for Networking at Rock Concerts

So, here are some tips for making the most of it:

1. Wear a concert T-Shirt to a concert. I suggest one that is from an artist of the same genre.  I recently wore a Pink Floyd shirt at a Counting Crows concert. A Tie Dye is a must for a Dead show of course.

2. Bring your camera phone and take pictures at the show.  Ask others around you to take pictures with you in them.  Best part – offer to e-mail the pictures to them.  Of course, you will need a business card from them or at least an e-mail address and that is where the networking starts.

3. Get good seats down front. People in decision-making roles do not sit in the back.

The Importance of Music & Social Media

You may be asking yourself, “What is the connection between music & social media?”

Music is the universal language that unites us in the world regardless of our many differences.

Music raises our social consciousness.  It helps us reflect on happy or sad times.

Music empowers us.

Thanks to social media platforms like: Photobucket, Twitter, YouTube, Facebook, Blip.fm and others that help us achieve this.

Two examples are from Twitter and other media that allowed a response and reaction to the shocking news of the death of “King of Pop” icon Michael Jackson or the recent B.E.P.

performance in Chicago kicking off Oprah’s 24th TV season.

~Liz Isaacs, Writing & Marketing Communications, Lotus Writing & Communications
liz@lotuswommunications.net
http://www.linkedin.com/in/lotuswritngcommunications
http://www.twitter.com/lizisaacslwc or @lizisaacslwc

On Being Nominated for the #RockTheWorld Best LinkedIn Profile Contest

A few weeks ago, I was nominated for being one of many in the #rocktheworld Best LinkedIn Profile Contest held by LinkedIn/Social Media Experts, Mike O’Neill and Lori Ruff, of Integrated Alliances of Denver. The top five LinkedIn profiles with the most votes will be featured in Mike’s book, “Rock the World With Your Online Presence,” to be released later next month.
Of course, I am thrilled to be considered for such an honor, as anyone would be and to be included with such an esteemed group of colleagues. I have to admit that I kind of felt like a kid in high school again, especially, to be nominated in a contest with a Robert Plant reference.
But I had to laugh, because it wasn’t until returning from the U.S. Small Business Conference™ held in St. Louis this past September, that I was able to utilize the many of the tips mentioned in a presentation by LinkedIn expert and Co-author of “Linked Working: Generating Success on LinkedIn the Worlds Largest Professional Networking Website,” Lewis Howes.  I had attended other LinkedIn workshops, which all were beneficial. Lewis’s presentation put the icing on the cake of things I needed to focus on in my profile to make me get noticed as an expert in my field.
As a result, many of my connections and others have been noticing my profile and inquiring more about my services with Lotus Writing & Communications and my personal writing goals. Regardless, of the outcome of the contest and whether or not I am featured in Mike’s book, I feel honored to be considered and that it validates what I do passionately….connecting with others…helping them blossom and flourish and achieving their fullest potential…and my writing.
~Liz Isaacs, Writing & Marketing Communications Strategist, Lotus Writing & Communications
P.S. If you haven’t voted in the contest here’s the info: #rocktheworld http://bit.ly/4CIMHC
liz@lotuswommunications.net
http://www.linkedin.com/in/lotuswritngcommunications
http://www.twitter.com/lizisaacslwc or @lizisaacslwc
http://lotuswritingcommunications.wordpress.com
http://www.lotuswritingcommunications.net
A few weeks ago, I was nominated for being one of many in the #rocktheworld Best LinkedIn Profile Contest held by LinkedIn/Social Media Experts, Mike O’Neill and Lori Ruff, of Integrated Alliances of Denver. The top five LinkedIn profiles with the most votes will be featured in Mike’s book, “Rock the World With Your Online Presence,” to be released later next month.
Of course, I am thrilled to be considered for such an honor, as anyone would be and to be included with such an esteemed group of colleagues. I have to admit that I kind of felt like a kid in high school again, especially, to be nominated in a contest with a Robert Plant reference.
But I had to laugh, because it wasn’t until returning from the U.S. Small Business Conference™ held in St. Louis this past September, that I was able to utilize the many of the tips mentioned in a presentation by LinkedIn expert and Co-author of “Linked Working: Generating Success on LinkedIn the Worlds Largest Professional Networking Website,” Lewis Howes.  I had attended other LinkedIn workshops, which all were beneficial. Lewis’s presentation put the icing on the cake of things I needed to focus on in my profile to make me get noticed as an expert in my field.
As a result, many of my connections and others have been noticing my profile and inquiring more about my services with Lotus Writing & Communications and my personal writing goals. Regardless, of the outcome of the contest and whether or not I am featured in Mike’s book, I feel honored to be considered and that it validates what I do passionately….connecting with others…helping them blossom and flourish and achieving their fullest potential…and my writing.
~Liz Isaacs, Writing & Marketing Communications Strategist, Lotus Writing & Communications
P.S. If you haven’t voted in the contest here’s the info: #rocktheworld http://bit.ly/4CIMHC
liz@lotuswommunications.net
http://www.linkedin.com/in/lotuswritngcommunications
http://www.twitter.com/lizisaacslwc or @lizisaacslwc
http://lotuswritingcommunications.wordpress.com
http://www.lotuswritingcommunications.net
A few weeks ago, I was nominated for being one of many in the #rocktheworld Best LinkedIn Profile Contest held by LinkedIn/Social Media Experts, Mike O’Neill and Lori Ruff, of Integrated Alliances of Denver. The top five LinkedIn profiles with the most votes will be featured in Mike’s book, “Rock the World With Your Online Presence,” to be released later next month.
Of course, I am thrilled to be considered for such an honor, as anyone would be and to be included with such an esteemed group of colleagues. I have to admit that I kind of felt like a kid in high school again, especially, to be nominated in a contest with a Robert Plant reference.
But I had to laugh, because it wasn’t until returning from the U.S. Small Business Conference™ held in St. Louis this past September, that I was able to utilize the many of the tips mentioned in a presentation by LinkedIn expert and Co-author of “Linked Working: Generating Success on LinkedIn the Worlds Largest Professional Networking Website,” Lewis Howes.  I had attended other LinkedIn workshops, which all were beneficial. Lewis’s presentation put the icing on the cake of things I needed to focus on in my profile to make me get noticed as an expert in my field.
As a result, many of my connections and others have been noticing my profile and inquiring more about my services with Lotus Writing & Communications and my personal writing goals. Regardless, of the outcome of the contest and whether or not I am featured in Mike’s book, I feel honored to be considered and that it validates what I do passionately….connecting with others…helping them blossom and flourish and achieving their fullest potential…and my writing.
~Liz Isaacs, Writing & Marketing Communications Strategist, Lotus Writing & Communications
P.S. If you haven’t voted in the contest here’s the info: #rocktheworld http://bit.ly/4CIMHC
liz@lotuswommunications.net
http://www.linkedin.com/in/lotuswritngcommunications
http://www.twitter.com/lizisaacslwc or @lizisaacslwc
http://lotuswritingcommunications.wordpress.com
http://www.lotuswritingcommunications.net
A few weeks ago, I was nominated for being one of many in the #rocktheworld Best LinkedIn Profile Contest held by LinkedIn/Social Media Experts, Mike O’Neill and Lori Ruff, of Integrated Alliances of Denver. The top five LinkedIn profiles with the most votes will be featured in Mike’s book, “Rock the World With Your Online Presence,” to be released later next month.
Of course, I am thrilled to be considered for such an honor, as anyone would be and to be included with such an esteemed group of colleagues. I have to admit that I kind of felt like a kid in high school again, especially, to be nominated in a contest with a Robert Plant reference.
But I had to laugh, because it wasn’t until returning from the U.S. Small Business Conference™ held in St. Louis this past September, that I was able to utilize the many of the tips mentioned in a presentation by LinkedIn expert and Co-author of “Linked Working: Generating Success on LinkedIn the Worlds Largest Professional Networking Website,” Lewis Howes.  I had attended other LinkedIn workshops, which all were beneficial. Lewis’s presentation put the icing on the cake of things I needed to focus on in my profile to make me get noticed as an expert in my field.
As a result, many of my connections and others have been noticing my profile and inquiring more about my services with Lotus Writing & Communications and my personal writing goals. Regardless, of the outcome of the contest and whether or not I am featured in Mike’s book, I feel honored to be considered and that it validates what I do passionately….connecting with others…helping them blossom and flourish and achieving their fullest potential…and my writing.
~Liz Isaacs, Writing & Marketing Communications Strategist, Lotus Writing & Communications
P.S. If you haven’t voted in the contest here’s the info: #rocktheworld http://bit.ly/4CIMHC
liz@lotuswommunications.net
http://www.linkedin.com/in/lotuswritngcommunications
http://www.twitter.com/lizisaacslwc or @lizisaacslwc
http://lotuswritingcommunications.wordpress.com
http://www.lotuswritingcommunications.net
A few weeks ago, I was nominated for being one of many in the #rocktheworld Best LinkedIn Profile Contest held by LinkedIn/Social Media Experts, Mike O’Neill and Lori Ruff, of Integrated Alliances of Denver. The top five LinkedIn profiles with the most votes will be featured in Mike’s book, “Rock the World With Your Online Presence,” to be released later next month.
Of course, I am thrilled to be considered for such an honor, as anyone would be and to be included with such an esteemed group of colleagues. I have to admit that I kind of felt like a kid in high school again, especially, to be nominated in a contest with a Robert Plant reference.
But I had to laugh, because it wasn’t until returning from the U.S. Small Business Conference™ held in St. Louis this past September, that I was able to utilize the many of the tips mentioned in a presentation by LinkedIn expert and Co-author of “Linked Working: Generating Success on LinkedIn the Worlds Largest Professional Networking Website,” Lewis Howes.  I had attended other LinkedIn workshops, which all were beneficial. Lewis’s presentation put the icing on the cake of things I needed to focus on in my profile to make me get noticed as an expert in my field.
As a result, many of my connections and others have been noticing my profile and inquiring more about my services with Lotus Writing & Communications and my personal writing goals. Regardless, of the outcome of the contest and whether or not I am featured in Mike’s book, I feel honored to be considered and that it validates what I do passionately….connecting with others…helping them blossom and flourish and achieving their fullest potential…and my writing.
~Liz Isaacs, Writing & Marketing Communications Strategist, Lotus Writing & Communications
P.S. If you haven’t voted in the contest here’s the info: #rocktheworld http://bit.ly/4CIMHC
liz@lotuswommunications.net
http://www.linkedin.com/in/lotuswritngcommunications
http://www.twitter.com/lizisaacslwc or @lizisaacslwc
http://lotuswritingcommunications.wordpress.com
http://www.lotuswritingcommunications

A few days ago, I was nominated in the #rocktheworld Best LinkedIn Profile Contest held by LinkedIn/Social Media Experts, Mike O’Neill and Lori Ruff, of Integrated Alliances of Denver. The top five LinkedIn profiles including the top vote-getter will be featured in Mike’s book, “Rock the World With Your Online Presence,” to be released late November.

Of course, I am thrilled to be considered for such an honor (as anyone would be) and to be included with such an esteemed group of colleagues. I have to admit that I kind of felt like a kid in high school again, especially, to be nominated in a contest with a Robert Plant reference.

But I had to grin, because it wasn’t until returning from the U.S. Small Business Conference™ held in St. Louis this past September, that I was able to utilize the many of the tips mentioned in a presentation by LinkedIn expert Lewis Howes, co-author of “LinkedWorking: Generating Success on LinkedIn, the Worlds Largest Professional Networking Website.”  Lewis mentions Mike O’Neil, founder of Integrated Alliances, as a LinkedIn Profile expert in his book.

I had attended other LinkedIn workshops, which all were beneficial. Lewis’s presentation put the icing on the cake that I needed to focus on in my profile to help me get noticed as an expert in my field.

As a result, many of my connections and others have been finding and reading my profile and inquiring about my professional services offered through Lotus Writing & Communications as well as my personal writing goals. Regardless of the outcome of the contest, and whether or not I am featured in Mike’s book, I am honored to be considered. It validates the work I am passionate about….connecting with others…helping them blossom and flourish and achieve their fullest potential…and my writing.

~Liz Isaacs, Writing & Marketing Communications Strategist, Lotus Writing & Communications

P.S. If you haven’t voted in the contest here’s the info: #rocktheworld http://bit.ly/4CIMHC

liz@lotuswommunications.net

http://www.linkedin.com/in/lotuswritngcommunications

http://www.twitter.com/lizisaacslwc or @lizisaacslwc

Checklist For Selecting a Social Networking Expert

This is an update to our original post from May 6. The original post was focused exclusively on simple, “in your face”, ways to get an idea of the relative expertise of  a “self-proclaimed” LinkedIn Expert or Social Media Expert.

We are well aware that there are many other factors that fill in this picture and the blog post comments below are very good at explaining what some of the “analog” methods might be.

The purpose of this post was to get a quickie look at some things that might give a brief indication, vs. exhaustive test, of relative suitability for speaking or consulting.  As such, we have modernized the post.

——

There seems to appear a new self-proclaimed Social Media Expert, LinkedIn Expert or Twitter Expert about every hour or two. They shout it out, present what might be their first Webinars or presentations and seem to forget that the world can see whether or not this is true.

One’s profile and network size are among the truest indicators of expertise. Profiles because they are the root of it all and Network Size because it is a skill that must be learned yourself before it can be taught to others.

Here are some things that you can do to see if these claims are brick solid or a house of cards about to fall under their own weighty claims.

LinkedIn:

  • Is their name clean, free of non-name text like an e-mail address? Should be preaching good housekeeping.
  • Do they have an appropriate photo?  Any photo at all?  Basic 101 requirement
  • Is their Profile Complete?  They can’t teach you completeness if they are not complete.
  • Do they list websites and are they not defaulted to “My Company” ?  This is basic customization any expert should know and know well. A true expert will show 3 Web sites that list a Twitter site, a facebook page or some mother social media location.
  • Is the Personal URL to their Profile customized?  Random characters in the profile URL are a red flag.
  • Does their Summary reflect their abilities?  This is their brochure.  Does it make you want to buy?
  • Do they even have Specialties listed?  Often overlooked by basic users but not Experts.
  • Are Jobs and Education listed all the way back with real data included?  SEO basics they should be practicing.
  • Are the Interests and Groups/Associations sections completed and “formatted” ?  The strategic use of comma’s is critical and experts know this.  Hover over the words here and you will see.
  • Are they a member of any LinkedIn Groups?  How many?  More than 20?  Groups are critical in LinkedIn circa 2009.
  • Does their Contact settings area tell you how to reach them?  They should know this.
  • How big is their network?  If it isn’t at 500+ you can stop right there…..  Experts without a following and not experts.
  • True LinkedIn experts cannot have small networks. It is a demonstration of their following and their network buiolding skills.  Should be 2,000+ and state it somewhere.
  • Are their connections being shared?  Blocking off connection sharing is only OK for a select few, not for Experts

Twitter:

  • Is their Twitter ID something that makes sense?  It should be their name or their company or something else that is strategic.
  • Can you find them when you search Twitter (try their name)?  Findable or not?  Do you want to be found?
  • Do they have an appropriate photo?  Simple best practice for business users.
  • How many Followers do they have? Should be 1,000 or more at the least!
  • How many others are they following? Should be within 10% of the Followers – basic Twitter strategy.
  • How many Updates have they done? Should be well over 500.
  • Does their Twitter profile tell you what they do? Free of mis-spellings?   Include URL?

These are the requirements for a B-level Social Media Expert, LinkedIn Expert or Twitter Expert. Maybe we will do a posting for an A-level Expert sometime (see the A-level players below).

We suggest you use this as a litmus test to gauge your experts. Here a few we recommend you look at.

Check out these true LinkedIn and Social Media Experts:

Mike O’Neil, Denver, 22,000 connections, 5,000 followers
www.linkedin.com/in/mikeoneil – Twitter @mikeoneildenver

Viveka von Rosen, Ft. Collins, 9,000 connections, 10,000 followers
www.linkedin.com/in/LinkedInExpert – Twitter @linkedinexpert

Lori Ruff, Denver & Charlotte, 8,000 connections, 4,000 followers
www.linkedin.com/in/loriruff – Twitter @loriruff

Dave Westfall, Denver, 10,000 connections, 2,000 followers
www.linkedin.com/in/davewestfall – Twitter @davewestfall

Dave Reingold, New Jersey, 5,000 connections
www.linkedin.com/in/davereingold

Ed Riefenstahl, Ft. Worth, 5,000 connections
www.linkedin.com/in/edriefenstahl

Valeria Riefenstahl, Ft. Worth, 4,000 connections
www.linkedin.com/in/valeriefiefenstahl

Brad Hanks, Denver, 14,000 connections, 4,000 followers
www.linkedin.com/in/bradhanks – Twitter @bradhanks

Rich Fiene, Minneapolis, 12,000 connections, 1,000 followers
www.linkedin.com/in/richfiene – Twitter @richfiene

Lonny Gulden, Minneapolis, 9,000 connections
www.linkedin.com/in/lonnygulden

Neal Schaffer, Los Angeles, 15,000 connections, 13,000 followers
www.linkedin.com/in/nealschaffer – Twitter @nealschaffer

Patrick O’Malley, Boston, 10,000 connections, 2,000 followers
www.linkedin.com/in/patrickomalley – Twitter @617patrick

Lewis Howes, Columbus, 5,000 connections, 6,000 followers
www.linkedin.com/in/lewishowes – Twitter @lewishowes

Miles Austin, Seattle, 5,000 connections, 1,500 followers
www.linkedin.com/in/milesaustin – Twitter @milesaustin

Integrated Alliances Web Site

Dan Schawbel of Gen-Y has a terrific post entitled “6 Reasons You Shouldn’t Brand Yourself as a Social Media Expert” that goes very well with this topic.  See the post

Twitter Status vs LinkedIn Status vs Facebook Status

In the LinkedIn and social media training we do, we always seem to get asked about the status function and if one status update might cover all three, LinkedIn, Facebook and Twitter.

Twitter statusing is really at the heart of it all. Statuses (Tweets) from here can feed LinkedIn, Facebook and a long list of other social media platforms by using tools like Ping.fm.  But, because you CAN share the status, does that mean you SHOULD?

This is what we do here at Integrated Alliances.  Maybe it will work for you:

Do NOT use a status utility to feed all three.  They have different purposes in terms of what types of information. I think you might want to try the following strategies.

LinkedIn statusing  is best for activities that have a 1 week to 1 month horizon.  It is not a real time statusing system, although you could do that if you liked. One other problem is that LinkedIn inserts your name at the beginning of the status statement. For example, on Twitter you might send:

“At the Denver Metro Chamber event meeting lots of new downtown business partners, Brown Palace, goes until 10.”

Whereas in LinkedIn it becomes:

“ Mike At the Denver Metro Chamber event meeting lots of new downtown business partners, Brown Palace, goes until 10.”

 Facebook statusing is generally for activities that are on the 1 day to 1 week horizon.  It works out well getting the feed from Twitter. People often comment on my Tweets right on my Facebook wall. This allows me to see and reply quickly to each comment.

So, how might actual status messages differ?

Some good examples of status updates for LinkedIn:

  • “Meeting with new customers from India, never thought that there would be more English speaking people there than in the US.”
  • “Looking for C++ programmers for 6 month project, data architect and coders needed. http://www.tinyurl.com/Tcsw3

Some good examples of status updates for  Facebook:

  • “Taste of Colorado this weekend. Opie Gone Bad hits the main stage at 3:30 on Sunday. Look for me in front.  I’ll be dancin”.
  • “Scored big – touring the commercial studio where they make 9News commercials, excited to meet Adele Arakawa, heard she races Porche’s.”

Some good examples of Twitter Tweets (status updates):

  • Hazel Miller band rockin’ the house at the Taste of Colorado, tunes from the new album.
  • At National Speaker Association event watching @klutze, knows her stuff. @stevespangler is up next – Learning how to do a YouTube Channel.
  • At #SXSW with my East Coast Buds, hitting 6th Street tonight for the VIP party, end up at Chili Willy’s.

TweetDeck and Twitter from a LinkedIn User’s Perspective

In this video I start a discussion around LinkedIn Groups.  We’ve had lots of questions on our last several shows about that topic.

I also explore the world around Twitter and the place that TweetDack plays in.  It walks through the deck, @replies, Direct Messages, keyword searching and more.

Integrated Alliances Video on Groups, Twitter, Tweetdeck

Twitter: @mikeoneildenver All sites at http://www.mikeisonline.com